The earlier we realise that our existence as members of a geographical location is determined by policies of the government, the better for all of us. When bad laws are formulated and implemented, the effect does not know any tribe or denomination we belong to, which means we all suffer the consequences.


In Nigeria, it is undeniable that most religious leaders have indoctrinated their followers to believe that political participation is abominable.

The above assertion is one of the reasons for our pitiable state as a nation, yet we daily complain about the unpalatable state of things in the country, with the belief that prayers can substitute the place of active involvement in politics and governance. I have been to churches where it was outrightly condemned that politics is evil, and it is not what a true child of God should be involved in. I began to wonder if the preachers actually understand what political participation means. Perhaps they have narrowed down their minds to contesting elective position(s). Even at that, is anything wrong with contesting elections as Christians? Anything can be sinful if caution is not taken, inclusive of food consumption.

However, for the sake of education, political participation in the Nigerian context includes but is not limited to the following: registration to vote by getting a personal voter’s card (PVC), collection of the PVC, voting during elections (very important), contesting elections (a choice), participating in political debates, canvassing support for candidates, lobbying, and a host of other things. All the aforementioned determine the emergence of leaders into the governance environment, and their performance (good or bad) determines our socioeconomic wellbeing as citizens.

The uproar by Christian leaders on the recently assented Companies and Allied Matters Act 2020 (CAMA 2020) by President Muhammad Buhari has reflected some level of sentiments by our religious leaders. Historically, the church and her leaders have, in a real sense, served as the conscience of nations. Still, unfortunately, the division in Christian bodies in Nigeria has opened the church up to political consequences by political vampires. The Nigerian Christian bodies and denominations have been speaking with a united voice in recent times against political matters, which, to an extent, can be assumed to be because of the personal interests of many which are likely to be affected. But on a personal note, I join my voice with others to call for a review of the CAMA law.

Beyond CAMA, when was the last time the Christian block spoke with a united voice about the state of education, healthcare delivery, agriculture, infrastructure, security, and corruption, etc. in the country? Are they not as important as the CAMA law, or perhaps more important than it?


One of the uniqueness of democracy is the room it provides for political participation by all citizens. Still, unfortunately, most of our religious leaders who are influencers in their jurisdictions have failed to influence their members to participate actively in this. Before CAMA was enacted and assented to, I assume there was a public hearing. If there was, were members of the Christian Association of Nigeria (CAN), Pentecostal Fellowship of Nigeria (PFN), and other Christian blocks represented?

Beyond CAMA, when was the last time the Christian block spoke with a united voice about the state of education, healthcare delivery, agriculture, infrastructure, security, and corruption, etc. in the country? Are they not as important as the CAMA law, or perhaps more important than it? When has any of our Christian leaders participated or mobilised members to participate in any public hearing? Do CAN and PFN have political strategists or advisers?

The church in the past played a very significant role in the emergence of advanced democracies. America and the United Kingdom are perfect examples of this, and I hope the Nigerian church will wake up to its responsibilities.

The earlier we realise that our existence as members of a geographical location is determined by policies of the government, the better for all of us. When bad laws are formulated and implemented, the effect does not know any tribe or denomination we belong to, which means we all suffer the consequences.

Olaogun Michael, a social commentator, wrote from Ilorin, Kwara State. Michaelolaogun2014@gmail.com